Frequently Asked Questions

About Medicaid Cards

Below are some questions people often ask about Medicaid cards.  Click on the questions to see the answers:

You may call 1-800-362-1504 toll free to get another card. Another way to request a card is to set up an account at My Medicaid. A link to My Medicaid is at the bottom of the Medicaid website home page or at https://medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Default.aspx?alias=medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Recipient This site also lets you make changes to your personal information, print out a temporary card and change your Patient 1st doctor. After you set up your account, remember to save your ID and password for future use.
You can print out a temporary card by setting up an account at My Medicaid. A link to My Medicaid is at the bottom of the Medicaid website home page or at https://medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Default.aspx?alias=medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Recipient This site also lets you make changes to your personal information and change your Patient 1st doctor. After you set up your account, remember to save your ID and password for future use. You can also visit your Medicaid worker for help in person.
You can use the number on the letter Medicaid sent to you until you get your card. Providers may also be able to enter your Social Security Number. You can call 1-800-362-1504 for help. Another way is to set up an account at My Medicaid. A link to My Medicaid is at the bottom of the Medicaid website home page or at https://medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Default.aspx?alias=medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Recipient. This site also lets you make changes to your personal information, print out a temporary card and change your Patient 1st doctor. After you set up your account, remember to save your ID and password for future use.
It can take a few weeks for your card to arrive. You will get a letter telling you if your application was approved, then your Medicaid card(s) will be sent. Until your card arrives, you can show your notification letter with your Medicaid number on it to get services. Another way is to set up an account at My Medicaid. A link to My Medicaid is at the bottom of the Medicaid website home page or at https://medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Default.aspx?alias=medicaidhcp.alabamaservices.org/Recipient This site also lets you make changes to your personal information, print out a temporary card and change Patient 1st doctors.
You will receive a card for your baby after you report your new baby's name, date of birth and Social Security number to your worker. If you don't know who your worker is, call or visit the Medicaid Office in your county. They are usually in the County Health Department.
If you are on Medicare and Medicaid and only get help paying for your Medicare Part B premium (either SLMB or QI-1 programs), you will not get a card. If you are on full Medicaid (along with Medicare), then call 1-800-362-1504 to request a card.
No. Medicaid replaces Medicaid ID cards at no cost to the recipient. If you are asked to pay for a Medicaid card, report the call to the toll-free fraud hotline at 1-866-452-4930.
Medicaid cards are issued to people who have Medicaid coverage. These cards are white, blue and green and look like a credit card. Each card has raised letters that show the recipient's name, ID number, date of birth, sex and a two-digit card number. On the back it has a stripe that swiped in doctor's offices that have the right equipment. Cards issued on or after June 2011 also have a hologram in the upper right corner. Medicare cards are typically paper cards that are red, white and blue and include the beneficiary's Social Security Number. That is expected to change in the near future.
You may call 1-800-362-1504 toll free and ask that your card be corrected. You may also want to contact your Medicaid worker so it can be corrected on your record as well. To find out who your worker is, call 1-800-362-1504.
Most people on Medicaid get a permanent plastic card. A few do not. These include recipients who do not have a Social Security Number, such as unborn children, newborns, foster children or some children who have been adopted; recipients who have retroactive eligibility, but not current eligibility; and many recipients who live in a nursing facility.